Diabetic Limb Loss Often Preventable

Ms. Severino, an elderly woman who was diagnosed with diabetes just a year ago, told her family doctor that her shoes fit her fine, and that there was no way they were the cause of her blister. In fact, the blister on the side of her foot didn’t even hurt, despite the fact that it was really quite red, and kind of swollen too. She had noticed it a few days ago, but hadn’t done anything about it, figuring it would get better on its own.

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Treatment of Shorter Leg is No Mystery

Most people obtain much of their medical knowledge from advertisements, gossip, and a host of unreliable sources. For example, it can be seen as amusing how often people don’t know that a problem can occur on only one side of the body. Most know that some internal organs are found on only one side, but many find it surprising that even the extremities can have differences. Sometimes these can be minor and of little clinical significance, while others can lead to a lifetime of pain and problems.

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The Truth About Dietary Fats

Did I get you with my title? Perhaps you imagined that you would learn in these pages about what was truly good for you, nutritionally speaking. Did you wonder if it was possible that someone might have the truth? My apologies, but I do not. My title was merely a hook, an age-old method of getting the reader interested, willing to slog through assorted facts presented, hoping to find some straight talk about nutrition.

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​​​​​​​Lupus Diagnosis as Difficutlt as Treatment

The human body is an amazing thing. The ability to stand and move, to walk, with little thought, without injury; these are complex processes. How about the body’s efficiency at fighting off the billions of bacteria we come into contact with, all the dangerous possible infections, necessary to keep the body healthy? It’s a wonderful system, although extremely complex. As any efficiency engineer can tell you, the more complex a system becomes, the more opportunity for things to malfunction. That is why we have doctors!

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Many Consequences to A High Arched Foot

Know anyone who has sprained their ankle? Do you know anyone who hasn’t? Isn’t that a better question? Because of its weight-bearing function and the construction of this joint, the ankle is the most commonly injured joint among athletes, and a frequent cause of pain and problems in the general population. Some people have problems with recurrent ankle sprains, and feel like they can turn their ankle on a tiny crack in the sidewalk. Why does this happen so easily and so frequently to some? The explanation I hear so often is they have “weak ankles”, when, in actuality, they often have a deformed foot……the dreaded cavus foot!

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Mysterious Ankle Injury Has Simple Solution

I’ll bet you knew a guy like Joe. He was one of those fellows who was sort of popular in school, though not really part of the “it” crowd. He was smart, but not that smart, not one of the brainy nerds. Joe liked sports, but wasn’t ever good enough to be a starter or even a back-up; instead he was perpetually a bench warmer. Nonetheless, he tried, and that was appreciated. Because he was a nice guy, and didn’t make waves, he was included in many activities. Did you know a “Joe” in school?

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Vein Disease Not Easily Repaired

Chronic wounds are a significant health problem, and affect an increasingly large number of people. In the US, for example, chronic wounds are reported to affect 6.5 million patients with more than $25 billion each year spent by the healthcare system on treating wound-related complications. Diabetes is a disease that is becoming more common, and many of those so afflicted will develop chronic wounds, with studies revealing approximately 25% of diabetics experiencing an ulcer at some time in their life.

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Collapsing Arch Causes Nerve Compression Pain

I have a new case for you, and it’s one that some of you may be able to relate to. Have you ever experienced pain from the bottom of your foot? Suzie, our protagonist, did and had for years. She considered herself to be fairly normal: brought up in an average, middle-class family, worked in an office. Medically, nothing remarkable, being moderately over-weight, with mild, controlled hypertension, and that’s about it. Certainly, she was not able to be as active as she used to be, but she attributed that to the pain from her foot.

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Many Treatments For The Achilles Heel

Have you heard of the phenomenon of the weekend warrior? It’s not just a cliché, but a real thing, the desk-bound office worker, who sits at a desk for the 40-hour work week, then glued to the television after another tough workday. On the weekend, he goes to war on the local football field, the neighborhood hard court, or whichever is his game of choice. This type of combatant may be limited in his conditioning, but not his enthusiasm, and he harkens back to the days of yore, when he did battle with the energy and vitality of youth. He is no longer young in body, only in spirit. This is the prototypical weekend warrior.

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The Consequence of Falls

Most educated readers of this publication are likely aware of the changing global population trends, with the blossoming number of seniors certainly being one of the most impactful. Persons 65 years or older represented 14.5% of the U.S. population in 2014 and that number is expected to grow to be 21.7% of the population by 2040. World-wide, the number of older people is projected to increase more than 60 percent in just 15 years—in 2030, there will be about 1 billion older people, equivalent to 12.0 percent of the total population.

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Cancer Surgery Leads to Disfigured Limb

Certain diseases are more popular than others, which may sound like a strange statement, but to those in health care, this is a well-recognized phenomenon. I speak of popularity in terms of media attention, research efforts into cures, charitable organizations aiming to support this research, and support groups providing emotional succor to those afflicted. Heart disease must be considered one of the top attention-getters, as is diabetes. Skin cancer probably does not get enough. Those in wound care know that it’s a huge problem getting far less than it should. But this is not going to be an article about wound care, surprisingly.

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Many Complications to Pharmaceutical Treatment

When Susan, a 56-year old, advertising executive began experiencing pain in the back of her heel, she immediately attributed it to her new exercise regimen. Surprising, since it only consisted of walking farther, and more often. She wasn’t yet doing any treadmill work, or the yoga she was hoping to return to. Her fitness plan was largely due to the weight gain she had experienced over the last years, which had been steady, and quite disconcerting. Yet, over-all, her health was good. She did have a urinary tract infection some months ago, which had dragged on for weeks before an antibiotic knocked it out.

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Modern Science Battles Ancient Tradition Over Acupuncture

So you have back pain, and you’re suffering. How many activities, actions, and tasks don’t involve the back? Ask anyone with a chronic and painful condition that is causing back pain, and you will get an immediate response: NONE! How to find relief? What to do if the usual first-line treatments for this problem have been attempted, with inadequate benefits obtained? Injection therapy, a brace, physical therapy, these and many others may be utilized in the treatment of chronic back pain, but it is not infrequent that these fail.

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New Ways To Heal Old Wounds

There is an epidemic occurring (I know what you are thinking: another??), considered “silent” by many, taking place world-wide. Although research is on-going, and advances in technique and technology are announced almost daily, no one wants to talk about the non-healing wound they have. But chronic wounds affect around 6.5 million patients in our country, and the costs of caring for those afflicted is staggering.

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Shin Pain Caused By Foot Mechanics

Podiatric physicians have been essential in allowing many to begin, or continue, their exercise regimen. Many individuals, especially seniors, utilize walking as their primary form of aerobic exercise, obtaining many health benefits in the process. But what do you do when your favorite pursuit causes pain? Consulting with the appropriate health care provider is important to attain optimal health status.

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Diabetic Education Can Save Lives

Regular readers of this column will be well acquainted with the topic of diabetes, and especially some of the lower extremity complications. These facts bear repeating, partially because diabetes is now epidemic, but also because some of the most harmful and dangerous effects of this disease are preventable. I am referring specifically to lower extremity amputations, a life-changing event, in more ways than one.

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Foot Structure Key To Walking

No one thinks about walking. Walking is an incredibly complex act, that requires little to no conscious thought, but does demand the work of many muscles, the motion of hundreds of joints
in the body, and the stretching of ligaments throughout. Walking is the primary means of exercise for many individuals, but it’s a delicate balance of bone and muscle allows us to stand and walk with ease, and without pain.

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New Device Stretches Skin to Close Wounds

 Each era of medicine brings new advances. One of the most recent hot topics is wound care, which is the study and treatment of wounds that don’t heal in a normal and timely fashion. This frustrating and often painful condition is far more common than many realize, since it is almost always covered and out of sight. Intensive research has revealed much about wound care, including new and exciting ways to treat them.

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